Peter Tabichi Global Teacher Prize, star-studded event in Dubai

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Peter Tabichi Global Teacher Prize, star-studded event in Dubai.

Peter Tabichi, a Kenyan math and physics teacher, won the $1 million Varkey Foundation Global Teacher Prize at a star-studded event in Dubai Sunday (March 24).

Accompanied by his father, Tabichi said the prize showed that “teachers matter” and that “teaching is a noble profession.”

Tabichi left his job at a private school to join the Keriko Secondary School (in Pwani Village, Nakuru, Kenya), where 95% of the students are poor and almost a third are orphans. Drug abuse, teen pregnancies, drop-outs, and suicide are common, and the school has one computer, poor internet access, and a student-teacher ratio of 58:1.

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Peter Tabichi, a Kenyan math and physics teacher, won the $1 million Varkey Foundation Global Teacher Prize at a star-studded event in Dubai Sunday (March 24).

Accompanied by his father, Tabichi said the prize showed that “teachers matter” and that “teaching is a noble profession.”

Tabichi left his job at a private school to join the Keriko Secondary School (in Pwani Village, Nakuru, Kenya), where 95% of the students are poor and almost a third are orphans. Drug abuse, teen pregnancies, drop-outs, and suicide are common, and the school has one computer, poor internet access, and a student-teacher ratio of 58:1.

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The event is a massive celebration of teachers, who often work with little recognition and poor pay in severely resource-constrained environments. Tabichi is the fifth winner of the prize, which has also been won by an American, a Brit, a Palestinian, and a Canadian. Last year’s winner was Andria Zafirakou, an art and textiles teacher at Alperton Community School in the UK whom Quartz recently interviewed.

“Africa’s young people will no longer be held back by low expectations,” Tabichi said. “Africa will produce scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs whose names will be one day famous in every corner of the world. And girls will be a huge part of this story.”

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The prize is paid over 10 years. Recipients are meant to have practices that can be scaled, are innovative, and impact the community beyond the classroom. It also awards practices that help children become global citizens, “providing them with a values-based education that equips them for a world where they will potentially live, work and socialise with people from many different nationalities, cultures and religions.”

“If you don’t fail, you don’t learn, and if you don’t learn, you can’t change,” Tabichi said.

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